Weather Watch

SLO County weather forecast for the week of July 20

Here are the inland and coastal temperatures for San Luis Obispo County.
Here are the inland and coastal temperatures for San Luis Obispo County.

Here is this week’s weather forecast by PG&E meteorologist John Lindsey:

Abundant subtropical moisture from the remnants of Hurricane Dolores produced record amounts of July rainfall in San Luis Obispo County on Sunday. Previous records for the month of July were 0.59 of an inch at Paso Robles and 0.46 of an inch in San Luis Obispo; both of these records were set back in 1950.

A weather station in Paso Robles reported 3.55 inches, while numerous weather stations around San Luis Obispo reported around an inch of rain. Accompanying the rain were approximately 35,000 lightning strikes according to the www.SLOweather.com weather site.

Monsoonal moisture from the remnants of Hurricane Dolores will continue to stream northward into the Central Coast today into Tuesday morning and will likely to bring additional showers and thunderstorms to San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara counties through Tuesday morning.

This abundant subtropical moisture will produce warm overnight and daytime temperatures and very muggy conditions. In fact, our weather will be much more reminiscent of the Southeastern United States during summer than Central California.

A more typical weather pattern is expected to return along the Central Coast by Wednesday, with fresh to strong (19- to 31- mph) afternoon northwesterly winds along coast, cooler temperatures and lower humidity levels.

Monday’s Surf Report:

Today’s 3- to 5-foot northwesterly (310-degree, deep-water) swell (with an 8- to 12-second period) will remain at this height and period through Wednesday morning. A 3- to 5-foot northwesterly (310-degree, deep-water) sea and swell (with a 5- to 10-second period) is forecast on Wednesday afternoon, increasing to 4 to 6 feet (with 5- to 15-second period) on Thursday and will remain at this height and period through next Monday.

Arriving from the South:

Since former Hurricane Dolores took a more northerly route than originally forecasted, the swell from this tropical cyclone will take a more south-southeasterly incoming direction. A 2- to 3-foot southerly (160-degree, deep-water) swell (with a 10- to 12-second period) will arrive Monday, decreasing on Tuesday. Another tropical cyclone swell may arrive along our coastline next Monday.

Arriving from the Southern Hemisphere:

A large storm is developing east of New Zealand. Long-period Southern Hemisphere swell from this storm will arrive along our coastline Saturday at 1- to 2-feet (with an 18- to 20-second period), building to 2- to 4-feet (with a 17- to 19-second period) next Sunday and Monday.



At PG&E, your safety is our first concern. Lightning kills an average of 49 people in the United States each year, and hundreds more are severely injured. There is no safe place outside when thunderstorms are in the area. If you hear thunder, you are likely within striking distance of the storm. Just remember: “When Thunder Roars, Go Indoors.”

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