California

Yosemite Falls flowed all summer this year — and that hardly ever happens

Upper Yosemite Fall thunders down the cliffs at Yosemite National Park on Thursday, March 23, 2017.
Upper Yosemite Fall thunders down the cliffs at Yosemite National Park on Thursday, March 23, 2017. ckohlruss@fresnobee.com

If you’ve visited Yosemite National Park recently, you may have noticed something a little unusual.

Yosemite Falls, fed by snowmelt, is still churning out water — and it’s nearly October.

Scott Gediman, a spokesman for Yosemite who has worked at the park for two decades, told SFGate.com he doesn’t remember the waterfalls flowing continuously through the summer into fall.

“In an average year or even in a drought, Yosemite Falls goes dry from early to mid-July,” Gediman said in the story. “With the record or near-record snowpack, Yosemite Falls is still going. It never dried up.”

High water flows at Yosemite's falls are drawing photographers trying to capture moonbows, rainbows created by the light of the full moon.

The heavy snowstorms that hit the Sierra Nevada last winter contributed to a snowpack that stood at nearly double the normal amount on June 1.

Gediman also said Bridalveil Fall — which normally dries up in the later summer and early fall — is still going, thanks in part to a foot of snow that fell in the Tuolumne Meadows area last week.

“Generally, a mid-September trip to Yosemite Valley is beautiful because the colors are starting to change, but you don’t get waterfalls,” Gediman said. “To have waterfalls this time of the year is a bonus.”

Video provided by Austin Carey show him BASE jumping off Half Dome and (along with another jumper) off Glacier Point in Yosemite National Park. Carey faces federal charges because of the jumps.

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