Crime

Court hears 911 call from Templeton woman suffering fatal stab wound

Philip Thomas Hanes, 58, covers his face in court in October during a replay of a 911 call from live-in girlfriend Tina Marie Beddow, 32. His attorney, Ilan Funke-Bilu is at right at the preliminary hearing. The Templeton man is charged with murder in the fatal stabbing.
Philip Thomas Hanes, 58, covers his face in court in October during a replay of a 911 call from live-in girlfriend Tina Marie Beddow, 32. His attorney, Ilan Funke-Bilu is at right at the preliminary hearing. The Templeton man is charged with murder in the fatal stabbing. dmiddlecamp@thetribunenews.com

Panicked and crying out in pain, a woman killed in a June 4 stabbing told responding officers her boyfriend had attacked her because she was planning to leave him, according to dramatic patrol vehicle audio played Tuesday in San Luis Obispo Superior Court.

Philip Thomas Hanes, 58, who is facing a single count of murder in the death of live-in girlfriend Tina Marie Beddow, 32, bowed his head and covered his face as the audio played at his preliminary hearing.

Preliminary hearings establish if there is enough probable cause for a case to proceed to trial. After hearing the testimony, Superior Court Judge John Trice ruled that there was enough evidence to proceed. Hanes is due back in court Oct. 21.

At about 10:20 p.m. June 4, sheriff’s deputies responded to Hanes’ home on the 400 block of Eric Lane in Templeton after Beddow called 911 and said she had been stabbed. She was taken to a local hospital, where she died of her injuries.

Hanes was arrested at the scene. His 5-year-old grandson, who was living with Hanes and Beddow at the time, was home during the incident but not injured.

During Tuesday’s hearing, Deputy District Attorney Greg Devitt played for Trice two audio clips: the 911 call placed by Beddow and audio recorded from a sheriff’s deputy’s patrol vehicle.

In the 911 call, a voice Devitt claimed to be Beddow’s pleaded with the dispatcher to help her, repeating that she was bleeding and thought she was dying. The call was dropped, but not before Beddow was able to give the dispatcher her address.

In the second recording, as Beddow was being attending to by paramedics, another voice tries to calm her and asks her what happened.

“We got in a fight,” Beddow’s voice says. “I wanted to leave and he stabbed me.”

Beddow does not mention Hanes by name in the recordings.

Sgt. David Nottenkamper, who was among the first deputies at the scene, said that when he arrived two deputies had already detained Hanes at the door of the home. He said he found a “large amount” of blood in a hallway leading into a kitchen and a rear dining room, where he discovered Beddow lying curled up in a pool of blood.

Nottenkamper said he used a dishtowel to apply pressure to the wound until paramedics arrived.

In cross-examination, Hanes’ attorney, Ilan Funke-Bilu, asked the deputy if he smelled alcohol on Beddow.

“I have no idea,” Nottenkamper responded. “Honestly, all I could smell was blood.”

Sheriff’s Detective Hussein Abbas, the investigating officer in the case, testified that Beddow’s wound appeared to have come from an 11-1/2-inch fillet knife found at the residence.

Deputies also found numerous items in Hanes’ pockets, including a ring Abbas said was consistent with an engagement ring. He said family members later told him Beddow had worn the ring as an engagement ring since June 2013.

Abbas testified that Hanes spoke with investigators and initially said Beddow had been drinking that day and began yelling at him, telling him she was going to leave him.

He said Hanes told him Beddow wielded the fillet knife at Hanes as he was using the bathroom, and Hanes said he grabbed her hand and pointed the blade toward the center of her body and pushed slightly with his other hand.

“He said he did not think it would go in that far, or something to that effect,” Abbas said. “He said it went in like butter.”

Beddow’s liver and right lung were punctured by the blade, Abbas said.

Abbas said Hanes also told him he at first picked up the knife and placed it in the dishwasher, but decided to place it back on the floor because he did not want to disturb a crime scene.

Hanes later told him he wanted to “teach her a lesson about pulling a knife on somebody,” and inquired about what kind of punishment he was facing, Abbas said.

A former co-worker of Hanes from his employment with PG&E in Humboldt County also told Abbas that Hanes said he had compiled a “hit list” of people he would kill if he ever became terminally ill or was facing incarceration. “The defendant is not a peace-loving person,” Devitt told Trice. “He is a murderer.”

During cross-examination, in trying to establish Hanes’ defense if the case went to trial, Funke-Bilu suggested that the ring wasn’t an engagement ring. Under questioning, Abbas said that although alcohol could be smelled on Hanes’ breath, a breathalyzer was never given and that investigators never asked medical examiners to analyze possible causes of bruises found on Beddow’s wrists, hand and ankle.

Funke-Bilu asked if investigators had ever looked into Beddow’s drug use, alleging that she was hospitalized about two weeks before her death after being diagnosed with a methamphetamine-induced breakdown. The prosecutor objected to that as hearsay, and Trice agreed, so investigators did not answer that question.

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