Crime

Specifics remain scarce in Cambria man’s death

A friend of a slain Cambria man's family says this photo of Tyler Hanks and his 5-year-old pit bull, Ty, was taken in 2010 in Cambria. Hanks, 20, was found dead Sunday.
A friend of a slain Cambria man's family says this photo of Tyler Hanks and his 5-year-old pit bull, Ty, was taken in 2010 in Cambria. Hanks, 20, was found dead Sunday.

Investigators remain tight-lipped about the criminal record of the half-brother of a 20-year-old Cambria man found dead Aug. 26. They’re also not releasing any information about the homicide of Tyler Daniel Hanks, such as how and when he died, or whether his 22-year-old half-brother, Brandon Noble Henslee, is a suspect.

Henslee continues to be held in County Jail on an unrelated parole violation. He was arrested soon after investigators arrived at the Hanks-Henslee home on Leighton Street about eight hours before the body was found. They soon determined that the home was the likely scene of a crime.

No charges have been filed in the killing of Hanks, whose body was found in a grove of trees near the top of a deep ravine on the Fiscalini Ranch Preserve.

Officials, including the county Sheriff’s and District Attorney’s offices and the state parole office, won’t identify Henslee’s parole violation.

Henslee’s record shows a history of 10 cases since March 2008, including burglary, making criminal threats and resisting an officer. The cases sprang from investigations by the county Sheriff’s Office, Morro Bay Police Department, San Luis Obispo Police Department and county Probation Department.

The most recent entry in his record involves a request for release from Atascadero State Hospital.

Autopsy

Coroners performed an autopsy on Hanks’ body Aug. 29, but results won’t be available for weeks. Sheriff’s spokesman Tony Cipolla said investigators are painstakingly building a case about the homicide and likely won’t be sharing details anytime soon.

Sheriff Ian Parkinson and his staff have said they’re confident the crime was not a random one, and that — while it’s always a good idea for people to be aware of their surroundings — Cambrians shouldn’t worry unnecessarily about the homicide.

That was good news to people calling officials and staff at the weekly Cambrian newspaper to ask whether Park Hill, the neighborhood in which the Hanks-Henslee family lives, was safe for children.

Neighbors have said there often was a lot of activity at the home, and that sheriff’s deputies have been called to the house before.

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