The Cambrian

UU church’s new home

In front of their recently purchased future home in West Village are UUCC members, from left, Sabine Oliver, Margaret Randall, Brad Seek, Jane Eddy, Diane DeMarco, Mary Schwalbe, Tonya Gates, Judy Butler, Laurie Napoli and Dolores Miera.
In front of their recently purchased future home in West Village are UUCC members, from left, Sabine Oliver, Margaret Randall, Brad Seek, Jane Eddy, Diane DeMarco, Mary Schwalbe, Tonya Gates, Judy Butler, Laurie Napoli and Dolores Miera. COURTESY PHOTO

The Unitarian Universalist Community of Cambria (UUCC) is in the process of converting two adjacent offices in Arlington Square, a commercial building in West Village, into a meeting room and sanctuary that will allow the expansion of church and community programs and the opportunity to create a more comfortable sanctuary for Sunday services.

The group bought the two units March 30 and hopes to be ready to move in by late fall. Until then, UUCC will continue meeting at 10 a.m. Sunday mornings at the Veterans Memorial Building.

Sunday ser vices were first held in Cambria in December 2008. Four members of the San Luis Obispo congregation founded the Cambria church. The UUCC recently surpassed 30 members, which has allowed it to become a full-fledged member of the Unitarian Universalist Association of Congregations.

The lay-led UUCC invites speakers from different religious traditions and philosophical backgrounds to speak at services.

Unitarian Universalism is a liberal religion with Christian and Jewish roots. It has no creed. It affirms the worth of human beings, advocates freedom of belief and the search for advancing truth, and provides a warm, open, supportive community for people who believe that ethical living is the supreme witness of religion.

Seven principles guide Unitarian Universalist communities: The inherent worth and dignity of every person; justice, equity and compassion in human relations; acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth; a free and responsible search for truth and meaning; the right of conscience and the use of the democratic process; a goal of world community with peace, liberty and justice for all and respect for the interdependent web of life.

The UUCC originated and manages the electronic recycling booth at the Cambria Farmers Market, regularly sets aside money from Sunday collections to donate to local charities, has sponsored the local Head Start “Raising a Reader” program and donated books to preschoolers to encourage reading at home.

Sunday sermon topics are appear weekly in The Cambrian “Come Worship with Us” advertising section. UUCC welcomes anyone in the community. For more information, go to uuccambria.org.

— Janet Cooper, special to The Cambrian

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