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Hotel, homes, Japanese cultural hub planned for Arroyo Grande

A mixed-use development at East Cherry Avenue and Traffic Way in Arroyo Grande could include 58 single-family homes in “Subarea 2,” the largest of the three parcels at 11.62 acres.
A mixed-use development at East Cherry Avenue and Traffic Way in Arroyo Grande could include 58 single-family homes in “Subarea 2,” the largest of the three parcels at 11.62 acres.

Preliminary planning work is moving forward on a proposed mixed-use development in Arroyo Grande that could add a 100-room hotel, residential housing and Japanese community garden on the southeastern edge of the city.

It is now collecting comments on a draft environmental impact report for the site that would bring together three parcels, totaling about 15.3 acres, and create a unified commercial and residential hub. The deadline to comment on the report is Monday.

The project, at East Cherry Avenue and Traffic Way, consists of three separately owned parcels. The proposed development on the sites are still conceptual and will have to be brought back to the city for final approval.

On the first parcel, known as “Subarea 1,” SRK Hotels is proposing to build a three-story, 46,800-square-foot hotel with 90 to 100 rooms. It is also considering adding a stand-alone restaurant on the 2.16-acre site. According to a city staff report, the lot is owned by Arroyo Grande residents Harshad and Vina Panchal.

The second parcel, “Subarea 2,” is the largest of the three parcels at 11.62 acres, and it will likely be the home of about 58 single-family residential lots, plus a neighborhood park. It is owned by NKT Development LLC, though Mangano Homes Inc. is the company proposing the housing.

The third and final parcel, “Subarea 3,” is owned by the Arroyo Grande Valley Japanese Welfare Association. It is proposing to build a community center, 10-unit senior housing building, bed-and-breakfast guesthouse, farm stand, historic orchard and Japanese cultural gardens with walking paths. According to the project description, the development would “highlight the Issei pioneers (first-generation settlers) of Arroyo Grande.

The draft environmental impact report is available on Arroyo Grande’s website at www.arroyogrande.org/569/East-Cherry-Avenue-Specific-Plan. Comments can be directed to John Rickenbach at jfrickenbach@aol.com or mailed to 300 E. Branch St. in Arroyo Grande.

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