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Real estate agent apologizes for potentially illegal motocross video

Watch Topher Ingalls' motocross video filmed in SLO County

Topher Ingalls, a former professional motorcross racer and Templeton native, is now selling real estate in San Luis Obispo. He says he made this video to depict his transition from the world of motocross to that of real estate.
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Topher Ingalls, a former professional motorcross racer and Templeton native, is now selling real estate in San Luis Obispo. He says he made this video to depict his transition from the world of motocross to that of real estate.

The San Luis Obispo County motocross racer-turned-real estate agent, whose stunt-filled ad recently drew the ire of the CHP, is apologizing for his potentially less-than-legal actions.

Topher Ingalls, 26, a real estate agent for San Luis Obispo-based Buschur Realty, recently created a video ad depicting his motorcycle ride to work. A helmet-clad Ingalls makes his way to the office by off-roading, jumping over a freeway on-ramp, crossing over double yellow lines, doing wheelies on the highway and cruising through downtown San Luis Obispo.

Ingalls, who began riding motocross bikes at age 10, said he wanted the video to depict his transition from the world of motocross to that of real estate. He raced professionally from 2009 to early 2015, and said he’s in the process of starting a new career.

“To the average person, it probably looks like a death-defying stunt,” Ingalls said. “But I did it every day for so long.”

Officer Luke Hall of the Templeton CHP said Wednesday that he’ll be contacting Ingalls in the near future to ask him about the stunts and riding in the video, much of which he said aren’t legal.

Although riding such a bike on the street is allowed, the way in which Ingalls is riding, complete with wheelies and jumps, isn’t, Hall said.

After talking to Ingalls, authorities will decide whether to press charges, he said. The investigation is ongoing, and no final determination has been made, Hall said.

Filmmakers obtain permits to produce commercials in the Templeton area about five to 10 times per year, Hall said. When permits are given, he said, the CHP and other agencies block traffic during filming to prevent other vehicles from entering the area.

Ingalls said he didn’t get a permit to film on the streets.

Ingalls didn’t think he put anyone in danger, but understands why people are concerned, he said.

The jumps and riskier aspects of the ad were filmed early on a Sunday morning, after the crew had verified there were no cars around. Any cars that appear in shots involving stunts were driven by friends involved in the ad, Ingalls said.

Ingalls said he made sure to obey the speed limit whenever he was riding on the freeway or streets with other cars.

Even so, Ingalls apologized for not thinking the ad through.

“I made a mistake and would like to own up to it,” he said.

Paul Buschur of Buschur Realty said he supports Ingalls, calling him “a good kid.” He said he was aware of the video but was more focused on the concept, which he said Ingalls worked very hard to achieve.

“It was a good marketing piece,” Buschur said. “Some things just kind of backfired on him.”

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