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Drug case ends with time served

A Grover Beach man accused of giving his teenage half sister a drug that killed her received a sentence of 91 days’ credit for time served in San Luis Obispo County Jail after entering a plea of no contest to child endangerment.

San Luis Obispo Superior Court Judge Michael Duffy sentenced Theo Evan Macey, 27, last week based on a recommendation by the county Probation Department.

Macey’s 17-year-old half sister from Arroyo Grande was visiting him at a home off Amado Street in Nipomo, where she died. Macey was staying at the house with his girlfriend, according to authorities.

Macey also had faced a charge of furnishing the drug methadone to a minor. However, that count was dropped as part of the plea agreement.

Methadone is a drug often used to prevent withdrawal symptoms in those addicted to opiates.

The Tribune is not publishing the girl’s name because little information is known about the circumstances surrounding the incident that led to her death. The family has declined to comment about it.

“My client will be guilt-ridden for the rest of his life,” said Ilan Funke-Bilu, Macey’s attorney. “He loved his sister. He’s both the defendant and the victim as well. His sister was the most precious thing in his life. The last person he’d hurt is her.”

The girl had been depressed over a falling out with a boyfriend, and she had been planning to break up with him, according to a San Luis Obispo County Sheriff’s Office report.

According to the report, the girl died of a multiple-drug overdose. The Sheriff’s Office said she had a combination of prescription drugs and methadone in her body.

Though he denied to detectives that he gave the girl the drug, Macey had written in a cellphone text message that he gave the methadone to his half sister because he wanted to help her deal with depression, according to the Sheriff’s Office report.

The report also states that the teen “had a history of drug use as well as alcohol.”

Funke-Bilu said it was unclear to him specifically how she might have died and what drug may have played a direct role.

“I don’t know if there was enough there to convict him, but in his mind he feels that he could have done more, and I respect that,” Funke-Bilu said. “It was just a real unfortunate, tragic series of events.”

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