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Krinsky gets 4 years for gun charges

Howard Krinsky testifies that this M1A rifle he possessed was not outfitted with a flash suppressor on the tip of the barrel (which would make it an assault weapon), but is instead outfitted legally with a muzzle break.
Howard Krinsky testifies that this M1A rifle he possessed was not outfitted with a flash suppressor on the tip of the barrel (which would make it an assault weapon), but is instead outfitted legally with a muzzle break. Tribune

The Arroyo Grande man convicted last month of stockpiling illegal firearms at his home and selling machine guns was sentenced Friday to four years in Wasco State Prison.

Howard Alan Krinsky, 62, was sentenced by Judge Michael Duffy after hearing arguments from Krinsky’s attorney, Guy Galambos, and prosecutor Karen Gray.

Krinsky was convicted May 21 of six counts of crimes relating to firearms, including illegal weapons possession and sale of machine guns.

Galambos sought probation for his client’s sentencing; Krinsky faced a maximum of eight years and eight months in prison.

“We’re asking for six years (in prison),” Gray said at the hearing. “He remains defiant and unrepentant. He’s outraged at being prosecuted.”

Gray cited a County Probation Department report that said Krinsky stated “he is very upset that he was arrested” and that “he does not believe that he was in possession of illegal firearms.”

Gray said Krinsky is a danger to society and that he knowingly associated with a man, Alan Garrison, who is serving a six-year sentence for an illegal gun sales conviction.

But Galambos said Krinsky was a longtime collector of firearms and did not know he was required to register semiautomatic firearms, which is required by the 1989 Assault Weapons Control Act.

Galambos also said his client has no prior criminal record.

Galambos said Krinsky’s mistake was trusting Garrison when he shouldn’t have — going so far as to post bail for him after his arrest — and then having Garrison blame Krinsky.

Galambos said he was troubled by a statement in the probation report that Garrison had sent six e-mails to Krinsky discussing their involvement in building M60 machine guns. That information wasn’t presented as evidence in trial, Galambos said.

“I’m very disappointed,” Galambos said outside of court. “I’m especially disappointed by the last-minute stuff.”

Krinsky said in court Friday that he has already suffered enough without a jail sentence.

But Duffy said he was concerned the weapons would have ended up in the hands of criminals.

He said Krinsky’s sentence will help discourage others from engaging in similar behavior.

Galambos said his client will appeal the case.

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