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Yosemite ‘firefall’ captured by SLO photographer

San Luis Obispo photographer David Lalush captured the “firefall” phenomenon at Yosemite National Park on Saturday, Feb. 11, 2017.
San Luis Obispo photographer David Lalush captured the “firefall” phenomenon at Yosemite National Park on Saturday, Feb. 11, 2017. www.lalush.com

Mother Nature is again putting on a show at Yosemite National Park, where every February the setting sun draws a narrow sliver of light on a waterfall to make it glow like a cascade of molten lava.

The phenomenon known as “firefall” draws scores of photographers to a spot near Horsetail Fall, which flows down the granite face of the park’s famed rock formation, El Capitan.

Capturing the sight is a challenge. Horsetail Fall only flows in the winter or spring, when there is enough rain and snow. The sun lights up the fall for only about two minutes at dusk for a few days in February.

San Luis Obispo-based photographer David Lalush was able to capture the phenomenon on Saturday, Feb. 11.

After watching the weather all week, Lalush decided to head up to Yosemite on Friday night. Snow and icy conditions made for a slippery drive, he said, but he was able to capture some full moon shots on the valley floor.

“But the real prize was waiting for the firefall to appear at sunset,” he wrote on his Facebook page.

“It was truly amazing to witness this in person and I hope to return many more times.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

High water flows at Yosemite's falls are drawing photographers trying to capture moonbows, rainbows created by the light of the full moon.

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