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Anne Laddon’s oil painting 'Egg Whites (From Claudia’s Chickens),' won best of show for two-dimensional art.
Anne Laddon’s oil painting 'Egg Whites (From Claudia’s Chickens),' won best of show for two-dimensional art.

Tom Peck initially resisted entering anything in the Winter White exhibit at Studios on the Park.

“It was sort of like doing something on commission, not my favorite thing to do,” he said.

But then he figured “what the heck,” and created a work in ceramic that paid off. His statue, “Into the Northwind,” won best of show in the 3-D category. His usual genre is photography.

Ceramics are a relatively new medium for Peck, having started about five years ago when he moved to this area and had no studio. He’d always wanted to try has hand in clay, but after working on a wheel he decided the world didn’t need any more round pots, so he turned to sculpture. Working in clay came easy to him.

“Setting modesty aside, it was just in me,” he said.

Peck exhibited some of his sculptures recently at his studio at Studios in the Park, part of a large body of work that he describes as primitive contemporary.

“It’s really about the honest and directness and simplicity of primitive, but they have a little attitude in their body language,” he said.

As the founder of Studios in the Park, Anne Laddon had no qualms about entering the exhibit. She won Best of Show in 2-D for her oil painting. She had some fun naming it “Egg Whites (From Claudia’s Chickens),” as the subject isn’t a bowlful of runny albumen, but a carton of eggs. Laddon’s white eggs glow with soft pastel colors of reflected light. Fresh farm eggs aren’t necessarily a winter theme, as the hens usually lay off their production for the winter, but juror John Cosby sought personal vision and creative approach.

He also had his eye out for excellence of execution. Innovative works were encouraged for entry, along with all subjects and styles.

Although photographer A.J. Vincolisi, who earned an award of excellence, took his black-andwhite photo “Rogue in Fog” in late summer, the scene of a boat in the Morro Bay harbor looks wintery.

“I just happened to have a photo that fit the theme,” he said.

Since closing his Atascadero B&W Gallery, Vincolisi has more time to focus on his own work.

“I’m getting to make my own images more and have more time for myself,” he said.

The other award of excellence went to Jeanette Wolff of Cambria for her oil-stick rendering titled “Chance of Flurries.” The rough but lively drawing, which Wolff whipped out in less than an hour, depicts a featureless woman, bundled up, seeming to fight the wind as she walks across an open space. Raised in Alaska, Wolff is familiar with flurries, but her drawing was based on a photo she took in St. Mark’s Square in Venice late fall about 10 years ago.

“I felt cold and I think I made it look cold,” she said.

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