In this Saturday, Nov. 3, 2018, photo, Celene Navarette, second from left, helps Ella J. Varela with an art project as her father Eric, left, and her mother Enia look on during the workshop at La Libreria book store in Los Angeles. The market for Spanish books is growing but the traditional publishing industry has addressed demand in fits and starts. Three small companies have stepped in to fill the void, launched by three different pairs of Hispanic mothers frustrated by the dearth of Spanish-language books to reach to their children. They swiftly found demand from major retailers like Target and schools across the U.S.
In this Saturday, Nov. 3, 2018, photo, Celene Navarette, second from left, helps Ella J. Varela with an art project as her father Eric, left, and her mother Enia look on during the workshop at La Libreria book store in Los Angeles. The market for Spanish books is growing but the traditional publishing industry has addressed demand in fits and starts. Three small companies have stepped in to fill the void, launched by three different pairs of Hispanic mothers frustrated by the dearth of Spanish-language books to reach to their children. They swiftly found demand from major retailers like Target and schools across the U.S. Chris Carlson AP Photo
In this Saturday, Nov. 3, 2018, photo, Celene Navarette, second from left, helps Ella J. Varela with an art project as her father Eric, left, and her mother Enia look on during the workshop at La Libreria book store in Los Angeles. The market for Spanish books is growing but the traditional publishing industry has addressed demand in fits and starts. Three small companies have stepped in to fill the void, launched by three different pairs of Hispanic mothers frustrated by the dearth of Spanish-language books to reach to their children. They swiftly found demand from major retailers like Target and schools across the U.S. Chris Carlson AP Photo