Department of Water Resources workers check on the flow of the Oroville Dam's main spillway on Friday, March 17, 2017, after water resumed flowing down the fractured main spillway. New state legislation clamping secrecy on “emergency action plans” for dam failures might thwart terrorists, but will also thwart the public’s right to know whether dams are safe.
Department of Water Resources workers check on the flow of the Oroville Dam's main spillway on Friday, March 17, 2017, after water resumed flowing down the fractured main spillway. New state legislation clamping secrecy on “emergency action plans” for dam failures might thwart terrorists, but will also thwart the public’s right to know whether dams are safe. Hector Amezcua hamezcua@sacbee.com
Department of Water Resources workers check on the flow of the Oroville Dam's main spillway on Friday, March 17, 2017, after water resumed flowing down the fractured main spillway. New state legislation clamping secrecy on “emergency action plans” for dam failures might thwart terrorists, but will also thwart the public’s right to know whether dams are safe. Hector Amezcua hamezcua@sacbee.com

In California, accountability depends on transparency, which is under siege

September 10, 2017 12:01 AM

UPDATED September 10, 2017 12:01 AM