A dilapidated green sign marks the eastern boundary of Our Town, a project in the 1960s that proposed to bring 4,000 homes to the east side of Paso Robles off Linne Road. The homes in the background are among the 13 models built by developer Winfield Scott Condict. He eventually went bankrupt.
A dilapidated green sign marks the eastern boundary of Our Town, a project in the 1960s that proposed to bring 4,000 homes to the east side of Paso Robles off Linne Road. The homes in the background are among the 13 models built by developer Winfield Scott Condict. He eventually went bankrupt. David Middlecamp dmiddlecamp@thetribunenews.com
A dilapidated green sign marks the eastern boundary of Our Town, a project in the 1960s that proposed to bring 4,000 homes to the east side of Paso Robles off Linne Road. The homes in the background are among the 13 models built by developer Winfield Scott Condict. He eventually went bankrupt. David Middlecamp dmiddlecamp@thetribunenews.com

Property planned for new Paso homes was once the site of a grand dream gone bankrupt

March 23, 2017 04:27 PM

UPDATED March 23, 2017 05:19 PM

About Over the Hill

Phil Dirkx

Phil Dirkx has lived in Paso Robles for more than four decades, and his column is published every week. Reach him at 238-2372 or phild2008@sbcglobal.net .