William Randolph Hearst was the eccentric genius behind the giant Hearst Corp. media empire and an estate we now call Hearst Castle. One of the nation's most controversial public figures, he was known for yellow journalism and headline grabbing. Hearst ranch in San Simeon had been purchased and developed by U.S. Sen. George Hearst, father of the publisher. In 1919, Hearst decided to build his castle and put Julia Morgan, a famous San Francisco architect, in charge of planning. Within a few years as many as 650 men were working on the Castle and grounds at one time, ships were bringing whole cargoes from Europe where Hearst and his agents were buying castles, furniture, artifacts, relics--whatever took his fancy. In the late 1920s, presidents and potentates, millionaires and movie stars, politicians and poets would form the parade winding up the narrow road to the Enchanted Hill. By 1941 the era of stars visiting the hill was essentially done, though construction would continue in fits and starts. As Japanese submarines began shelling the coast and sinking ships, Hearst moved away from his beloved home on the hill. His newspaper's anti-Japanese viewpoints made him wary of offering an attractive target to the Imperial Government.  Declining health in 1947 forced him to leave San Simeon, and construction was halted after 28 years. At the age of 89 Hearst died in Beverly Hills in 1951. In 1958, the lonely Castle came under state administration and was opened to the public. Read more »
William Randolph Hearst was the eccentric genius behind the giant Hearst Corp. media empire and an estate we now call Hearst Castle. One of the nation's most controversial public figures, he was known for yellow journalism and headline grabbing. Hearst ranch in San Simeon had been purchased and developed by U.S. Sen. George Hearst, father of the publisher. In 1919, Hearst decided to build his castle and put Julia Morgan, a famous San Francisco architect, in charge of planning. Within a few years as many as 650 men were working on the Castle and grounds at one time, ships were bringing whole cargoes from Europe where Hearst and his agents were buying castles, furniture, artifacts, relics--whatever took his fancy. In the late 1920s, presidents and potentates, millionaires and movie stars, politicians and poets would form the parade winding up the narrow road to the Enchanted Hill. By 1941 the era of stars visiting the hill was essentially done, though construction would continue in fits and starts. As Japanese submarines began shelling the coast and sinking ships, Hearst moved away from his beloved home on the hill. His newspaper's anti-Japanese viewpoints made him wary of offering an attractive target to the Imperial Government. Declining health in 1947 forced him to leave San Simeon, and construction was halted after 28 years. At the age of 89 Hearst died in Beverly Hills in 1951. In 1958, the lonely Castle came under state administration and was opened to the public. Read more »
William Randolph Hearst was the eccentric genius behind the giant Hearst Corp. media empire and an estate we now call Hearst Castle. One of the nation's most controversial public figures, he was known for yellow journalism and headline grabbing. Hearst ranch in San Simeon had been purchased and developed by U.S. Sen. George Hearst, father of the publisher. In 1919, Hearst decided to build his castle and put Julia Morgan, a famous San Francisco architect, in charge of planning. Within a few years as many as 650 men were working on the Castle and grounds at one time, ships were bringing whole cargoes from Europe where Hearst and his agents were buying castles, furniture, artifacts, relics--whatever took his fancy. In the late 1920s, presidents and potentates, millionaires and movie stars, politicians and poets would form the parade winding up the narrow road to the Enchanted Hill. By 1941 the era of stars visiting the hill was essentially done, though construction would continue in fits and starts. As Japanese submarines began shelling the coast and sinking ships, Hearst moved away from his beloved home on the hill. His newspaper's anti-Japanese viewpoints made him wary of offering an attractive target to the Imperial Government. Declining health in 1947 forced him to leave San Simeon, and construction was halted after 28 years. At the age of 89 Hearst died in Beverly Hills in 1951. In 1958, the lonely Castle came under state administration and was opened to the public. Read more »

The Cambrian

'Citizen Hearst' documentary to be shown at Hearst Castle

February 06, 2013 6:45 PM

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