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  • How Pacific Coast Lumber of SLO gives dead trees new life in people's homes

    When dead and rotting trees are cleared from Cambria’s ailing Monterey pine forest, most end up chipped, chopped for firewood or even chucked in a landfill. But a small portion are finding a second life as rustic cabins, benches, tables and other wood products milled and handcrafted at Pacific Coast Lumber.

When dead and rotting trees are cleared from Cambria’s ailing Monterey pine forest, most end up chipped, chopped for firewood or even chucked in a landfill. But a small portion are finding a second life as rustic cabins, benches, tables and other wood products milled and handcrafted at Pacific Coast Lumber. David Middlecamp The Tribune
When dead and rotting trees are cleared from Cambria’s ailing Monterey pine forest, most end up chipped, chopped for firewood or even chucked in a landfill. But a small portion are finding a second life as rustic cabins, benches, tables and other wood products milled and handcrafted at Pacific Coast Lumber. David Middlecamp The Tribune

Pacific Coast Lumber gives dead Central Coast trees new life. Here’s how it’s done.

December 08, 2016 12:52 AM