College Roundup: Cuesta men's basketball team eliminated from playoffs in OT

Cerritos men’s basketball team locks down Pedroso on way to 71-67 regional victory

sports@thetribunenews.comFebruary 28, 2014 

Western State Conference player of the year Oscar Pedroso was limited to just 3-of-10 shooting and 11 points as the Cuesta College men’s basketball team fell to Cerritos in overtime, 71-67, in the CCCAA Southern California Regional Playoffs on Friday night in Norwalk.

The Cougars (21-10) missed their first 11 field-goal attempts and went the first six minutes without scoring. Their defense kept them in the game, as they trailed by six after the slump trailed 32-23 at halftime.

Kyle Geer, Brett Hartshorne and Alex Igual combined for 30 of Cuesta’s 38-second half points to help the Cougars come back, but they shot 1 of 7 from the free-throw line in the final minutes of regulation.

Cerritos held a four-point lead for the majority of the overtime period. Cuesta had a chance to cut the lead to one with 11 seconds left, but Geer’s 3-point attempt was off.

Hartshorne finished with a game-high 16 points for the Cougars.

WOMEN’S SOCCER

Cal Poly announces spring schedule

The Mustangs will host three teams this spring at Alex G. Spanos Stadium in the span of three Saturdays.

Cal Poly opens the spring season against Fresno City College on April 12 before taking on Cal State Monterey Bay in a doubleheader the following week. 

The final spring home game will be April 26 against CSU Bakersfield. 

The Mustangs will play one road game against rival UC Davis on May 4.

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